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Oklahoma man gets life without parole for hate…

A judge has sentenced a 63-year-old Oklahoma man to life in prison without the possibility of parole for gunning down his Lebanese neighbor in what the jury determined was a hate crime

You Can be the Next James Bond as Actor Sells…

You can be like the next Bond man as actor Daniel Craig is auctioning his limited-edition Aston Martin. Buzz60's Sean Dowling has more.

Kate Middleton Might've Worn A Green Dress To The…

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a dark-green gown to the BAFTAs, and social media users on Twitter expressed their disappointment.

Olympic Russian Curler Tests Positive On 2nd…

The Russian Olympic delegation says a second sample from curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii tested positive for a banned substance.

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'Black Panther' scores highest Monday ever with…

With largest Monday ever, 'Black Panther' zooms higher in the record books with $242 million gross in four days

Bears DB pleads guilty in northeast Iowa bar fracas

A Chicago Bears defensive back has pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges stemming from a fracas outside a bar in northeast Iowa

Trump plan: Less-comprehensive health plans at…

Trump administration backs less-comprehensive, lower cost health plans in proposed rules

Storm system brings flooding, freezing rain, snow…

A storm system stretching from Texas to the Great Lakes states with risks of flooding, freezing rain and snow is causing fatal accidents and forcing schools to close

Carbs, fat, DNA? Weight loss is finicky, new…

A precision nutrition approach to weight loss didn't hold up in a study testing low fat versus low carb depending on dieters' DNA profiles

Insiders: Russia troll farm even zanier than indictment says

Insiders say the U.S. indictment against the St. Petersburg troll farm only scratches the surface of the agency's zany, ambitious operations _ and glosses over just how unconvincing some of its stunts could be

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Makes Headway in DC

Elon Musk's dream of building a hyperloop that can move people between Washington, DC, and New York City in 29 minutes may be a small step closer to becoming a distant reality. A Nov. 29 permit issued by DC's Department of Transportation allows Musk's Boring Company to dig at an...

Luxury property ad blitz heralds Trump son's…

The eldest son of President Donald Trump has arrived in India to help sell luxury apartments and lavish attention on Indians who have bought units in Trump-branded developments

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Man charged with killing wife who disappeared at sea

A man who said his wife disappeared at sea when their boat collided with an unknown object near the Bahamas has been charged with murder

Man who died in Yellowstone in 2017 was looking for treasure

A 53-year-old Illinois man who fell to his death in Yellowstone National Park last year was looking for a supposed hidden cache of gold and jewels

Study: Getting a Flu Shot Could Help Save You…

The flu vaccine may only be 36% effective, but it could significantly decrease your chance of a heart attack. Tony Spitz has the details.

What Do The BAFTA Winners Say About The Upcoming…

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" won five of the top honors at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts movie awards.

Disney Reportedly Withholding Bonuses From Union…

The Walt Disney Co. is reportedly locked in contract negotiations with more than 35,000 Walt Disney World employees represented by unions.

GOP candidate defends campaign's AR-15 giveaway

Kansas congressional candidate Tyler Tannahill defends continuing his campaign's AR-15 giveaway in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting, saying, "I do support the Second Amendment in the hard times and the bad."

New CEO denies prior knowledge of sex claims…

The new CEO of Las Vegas-based Wynn Resorts says he was not aware of any of the sexual misconduct accusations against casino mogul Steve Wynn before they surfaced in a news report last month

Preventive treatment for peanut allergies…

The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way

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New dinosaurs are being discovered in record…

Every kid grows up loving dinosaurs. As we grow older we listen to science teachers explain how dinosaurs lived and died, we watch documentaries about the age when reptiles ruled the land, and by the time we reach adulthood most of us like to think we have a pretty good handle on what things were like millions and millions of years ago. A new study focusing on the frequency of fresh dinosaur discoveries suggests we might have it all wrong, and that our understanding of the hundreds of millions of years that preceded humanity's takeover of the planet could change dramatically over the next decade or two. All we know about the history of the dinosaurs is what we're able to piece together from the remains they left behind. We have bones and tracks and that's about it. Working with that sparse evidence has always been a challenge for paleontologists, but the frequency with which new dinosaurs are being discovered has spiked dramatically in just the past twenty years or so. Those new discoveries are constantly changing what we thought we knew about prehistoric life, and it won't be long before we look back on previous assumptions and find how misguided those guesses were. "It’s a nice little paper that shows that in the last 20 years, the number of dinosaur genera named, as well as the number of specimens of those genera, has increased greatly," Jonathan P. Tennant, co-author of the work, explains. "This has profound impacts on our understanding of dinosaur diversity, especially as these discoveries are unevenly spread over time and space. There are still huge gaps in our knowledge of the fossil record, and areas in space and geological time where the rapid pace of discovery is changing much of what we thought we knew about dinosaurs." You don't have to look far to find examples of how an increase in dinosaur discoveries has shifted our knowledge. A few decades ago, the idea that some land-dwelling dinosaur species were covered in feathers was laughable at best. Crafty hunters like the velociraptors in Jurassic Park are depicted as leathery beasts, but we now know that the creatures were largely covered in plumage. Likewise, the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex was long thought to be the ultimate predator, but more recent discoveries have suggested it may have also been a scavenger, feasting on already-dead carcasses rather than hunting for a fresh feast when it was hungry. There's no telling what discoveries lie under the next rock, but scientists are painting a prehistoric picture faster and with more detail than ever before, and it's quite exciting.

A Rod, a Shadow, and a Theory for Egypt's Almost…

Scientists have long puzzled over how the ancient Egyptians built the Great Pyramid of Giza (aka the Pyramid of Khufu) with such "extreme precision," per Live Science . This Wonder of the World is lined up with the compass points "with an accuracy of better than four minutes of arc, or...